The Church of England saves energy on a Sun(ny)day

The Church of England has installed energy saving solar panels on scores of its buildings - taking advantage of the extended feed-in-tariff window.

The government has tried backtracking on the feed-in-tariff (which sees subsidies paid to those who invest in renewable energy) but its appeal was rejected, and now, pending another appeal, businesses (and the Church) are rushing to take advantage of the new deadline.

In the first three months of this year the Church of England, helped by green energy company Ecotricity, has fitted solar panels to 150 churches, vicarages, schools and church halls in the South West alone. And Ecotricity had already provided 300 Church buildings across the diocese of Gloucester, Exeter and Bath & Wells with green energy.

The Church of England has set itself a target of cutting carbon emissions by 80% by 2050 as part of its ‘Shrinking the Footprint’ national campaign. And, of course, in the process of creating its own energy, the Church also saves money.

Russell Stables said, on behalf of the Church: "This is far more than a cost saving exercise - it is a means of demonstrating good stewardship and releasing money which can be directed towards mission and ministry."

Ecotricity founder Dale Vince said: "The Church of England is setting a great example for others to follow. They are looking right across their organisation and making it as sustainable as possible.

"The need to protect the environment is unarguable these days and organisations of all shapes, sizes and creeds need to step up and take responsibility like the Church of England has done."

[Image: St. Paul's Church, Hounslow by Maxwell Hamilton]

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